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CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: 'WATERCOLOUR' 1929

Posted on 2016-12-16 04:05:01 in LATEST
Francis Bacon, 'Watercolour' 1929. Watercolour, gouache, pencil and black ink on paper. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number 29-01.

Francis Bacon, 'Watercolour' 1929. Watercolour, gouache, pencil and black ink on paper. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number 29-01.

Early this year saw the long-awaited publication of the 'Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné'. Presenting for the first time ever the entire oeuvre of Bacon’s 584 paintings, including many previously unpublished works.

The Estate of Francis Bacon is always investigating new opportunities to share the life and art of Francis Bacon, and so today is excited to begin sharing excerpts from the catalogue via this website and our Facebook and Twitter channels.

An apt starting point to initiate our 'Francis Bacon Catalogué Raisonné Focus' is with Bacon's first completed painting 'Watercolour' 1929.

'Bacon recalled his first encounter with the works of Picasso, which he said occurred in 1927, as a kind of epiphany, despite which several years elapsed before its impact was manifested in his paintings. The leaves at the bottom left of 'Watercolour' and the late-cubist forms in general were derived from Fernand Léger, the classic portico from Giorgio de Chirico, and the sections of brick wall from Jean Lurçat's Smyrne I (1929 private collection). Bacon was aligning himself with European modernism, although the stylised diver is typical of Parisian art déco. At this stage there is little distinction between Bacon's designs for rugs and screens and his independent art works.' - Excerpt:Martin Harrison, FSA. 29-01 'Watercolour' 1929, Catalogue Raisonné Volume II, page 108.

We'll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you'd like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

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